225th – Jul, Aug, Sept, Oct, Nov done (10 more to do so 4 month get single items)

Aug 30

Nov 21

Sept 16

Aug 28Nov 3

Aug 8 7:30 pm

We commemorate the very spot where American Independence was made a great fact in the history of the world.
This photo was from the 225th Anniversary of the Battles of Saratoga in 2002 which was the largest of the most recent commemorations. But there has been an annual commemoration for years. The commemorations take different forms but they all recognize that “until the surrender of the British army under Burgoyne, the Declaration of Independence was but a declaration. It was a patriotic purpose asserted in bold words by brave men, who pledged for its main tenance their lives, their fortunes and their sacred honor. But here it was made a fact, by virtue of armed force. It had been regarded by the world merely as an act of defiance, but it was now seen that it contained the germs of a government, which the event we celebrate made one of the powers of the earth. Here rebellion was made revolution. Upon this ground, that which had in the eye of the law been treason, became triumphant patriotism,” according the Governor Horatio Seymour in 1877.
There is no doubt, this Victory at Saratoga is worthy of commemoration. We also have commemorate the over 500 casualties in the battles, skirmishes and siege that make up the Battles of Saratoga. The importance of this victory was explained in the New York Times Magazine (9 May 1999) in that “it launched two centuries of revolution elsewhere, it marked the beginning of the end of the British Empire and it breathed life into the United States of America.
The best way to explain why we commemorate the American Victory at Saratoga, was done by Governor Seymour. “these celebrations have tended to make our people wiser and better. It is to be hoped that they will be held on every battlefield in our country. They will not only restore the patriotism of our people but they will teach us the virtues of courage and patient endurance.”
We welcome those that wish to participate and contribute to the commemorations. Join in the pride, and you’ll appreciate the sense of community that’s been at the foundation of Saratoga for centuries. There are many ways you can help. To learn more contact historiantosaratoga@gmail.com
(Pictured is actors Actor Howard Burnham portraying General Burgoyne.)

Aug 24 6:30 pm

We commemorate the very spot where American Independence was made a great fact in the history of the world.
This photo was from the 225th Anniversary of the Battles of Saratoga in 2002 which was the largest of the most recent commemorations. But there has been an annual commemoration for years. The commemorations take different forms but they all recognize that “until the surrender of the British army under Burgoyne, the Declaration of Independence was but a declaration. It was a patriotic purpose asserted in bold words by brave men, who pledged for its main tenance their lives, their fortunes and their sacred honor. But here it was made a fact, by virtue of armed force. It had been regarded by the world merely as an act of defiance, but it was now seen that it contained the germs of a government, which the event we celebrate made one of the powers of the earth. Here rebellion was made revolution. Upon this ground, that which had in the eye of the law been treason, became triumphant patriotism,” according the Governor Horatio Seymour in 1877.
There is no doubt, this Victory at Saratoga is worthy of commemoration. We also have commemorate the over 500 casualties in the battles, skirmishes and siege that make up the Battles of Saratoga. The importance of this victory was explained in the New York Times Magazine (9 May 1999) in that “it launched two centuries of revolution elsewhere, it marked the beginning of the end of the British Empire and it breathed life into the United States of America.
The best way to explain why we commemorate the American Victory at Saratoga, was done by Governor Seymour. “these celebrations have tended to make our people wiser and better. It is to be hoped that they will be held on every battlefield in our country. They will not only restore the patriotism of our people but they will teach us the virtues of courage and patient endurance.”
We welcome those that wish to participate and contribute to the commemorations. Join in the pride, and you’ll appreciate the sense of community that’s been at the foundation of Saratoga for centuries. There are many ways you can help. To learn more contact historiantosaratoga@gmail.com
(Pictured is re-enactor David Bernier Sr. portraying General Gates leading a parade down Burgoyne street heading to Fort Hardy.)
We commemorate Saratoga!, 2002, 225th

We commemorate the very spot where American Independence was made a great fact in the history of the world.
This photo was from the 225th Anniversary of the Battles of Saratoga in 2002 which was the largest of the most recent commemorations. But there has been an annual commemoration for years. The commemorations take different forms but they all recognize that “until the surrender of the British army under Burgoyne, the Declaration of Independence was but a declaration. It was a patriotic purpose asserted in bold words by brave men, who pledged for its main tenance their lives, their fortunes and their sacred honor. But here it was made a fact, by virtue of armed force. It had been regarded by the world merely as an act of defiance, but it was now seen that it contained the germs of a government, which the event we celebrate made one of the powers of the earth. Here rebellion was made revolution. Upon this ground, that which had in the eye of the law been treason, became triumphant patriotism,” according the Governor Horatio Seymour in 1877.
There is no doubt, this Victory at Saratoga is worthy of commemoration. We also have commemorate the over 500 casualties in the battles, skirmishes and siege that make up the Battles of Saratoga. The importance of this victory was explained in the New York Times Magazine (9 May 1999) in that “it launched two centuries of revolution elsewhere, it marked the beginning of the end of the British Empire and it breathed life into the United States of America.
The best way to explain why we commemorate the American Victory at Saratoga, was done by Governor Seymour. “these celebrations have tended to make our people wiser and better. It is to be hoped that they will be held on every battlefield in our country. They will not only restore the patriotism of our people but they will teach us the virtues of courage and patient endurance.”
We welcome those that wish to participate and contribute to the commemorations. Join in the pride, and you’ll appreciate the sense of community that’s been at the foundation of Saratoga for centuries. There are many ways you can help. To learn more contact historiantosaratoga@gmail.com
(Pictured is actors Actor Howard Burnham portraying General Burgoyne and Paul Stillman portraying Benjamin Franklin.)

Sept 29

We commemorate the very spot where American Independence was made a great fact in the history of the world.
This photo was from the 225th Anniversary of the Battles of Saratoga in 2002 which was the largest of the most recent commemorations. But there has been an annual commemoration for years. The commemorations take different forms but they all recognize that “until the surrender of the British army under Burgoyne, the Declaration of Independence was but a declaration. It was a patriotic purpose asserted in bold words by brave men, who pledged for its main tenance their lives, their fortunes and their sacred honor. But here it was made a fact, by virtue of armed force. It had been regarded by the world merely as an act of defiance, but it was now seen that it contained the germs of a government, which the event we celebrate made one of the powers of the earth. Here rebellion was made revolution. Upon this ground, that which had in the eye of the law been treason, became triumphant patriotism,” according the Governor Horatio Seymour in 1877.
There is no doubt, this Victory at Saratoga is worthy of commemoration. We also have commemorate the over 500 casualties in the battles, skirmishes and siege that make up the Battles of Saratoga. The importance of this victory was explained in the New York Times Magazine (9 May 1999) in that “it launched two centuries of revolution elsewhere, it marked the beginning of the end of the British Empire and it breathed life into the United States of America.
The best way to explain why we commemorate the American Victory at Saratoga, was done by Governor Seymour. “these celebrations have tended to make our people wiser and better. It is to be hoped that they will be held on every battlefield in our country. They will not only restore the patriotism of our people but they will teach us the virtues of courage and patient endurance.”
We welcome those that wish to participate and contribute to the commemorations. Join in the pride, and you’ll appreciate the sense of community that’s been at the foundation of Saratoga for centuries. There are many ways you can help. To learn more contact historiantosaratoga@gmail.com
(Pictured is actors Actor Howard Burnham portraying General Burgoyne and Paul Stillman portraying Benjamin Franklin.)

We commemorate the very spot where American Independence was made a great fact in the history of the world.
This photo was from the 225th Anniversary of the Battles of Saratoga in 2002 which was the largest of the most recent commemorations. But there has been an annual commemoration for years. The commemorations take different forms but they all recognize that “until the surrender of the British army under Burgoyne, the Declaration of Independence was but a declaration. It was a patriotic purpose asserted in bold words by brave men, who pledged for its main tenance their lives, their fortunes and their sacred honor. But here it was made a fact, by virtue of armed force. It had been regarded by the world merely as an act of defiance, but it was now seen that it contained the germs of a government, which the event we celebrate made one of the powers of the earth. Here rebellion was made revolution. Upon this ground, that which had in the eye of the law been treason, became triumphant patriotism,” according the Governor Horatio Seymour in 1877.
There is no doubt, this Victory at Saratoga is worthy of commemoration. We also have commemorate the over 500 casualties in the battles, skirmishes and siege that make up the Battles of Saratoga. The importance of this victory was explained in the New York Times Magazine (9 May 1999) in that “it launched two centuries of revolution elsewhere, it marked the beginning of the end of the British Empire and it breathed life into the United States of America.
The best way to explain why we commemorate the American Victory at Saratoga, was done by Governor Seymour. “these celebrations have tended to make our people wiser and better. It is to be hoped that they will be held on every battlefield in our country. They will not only restore the patriotism of our people but they will teach us the virtues of courage and patient endurance.”
We welcome those that wish to participate and contribute to the commemorations. Join in the pride, and you’ll appreciate the sense of community that’s been at the foundation of Saratoga for centuries. There are many ways you can help. To learn more contact historiantosaratoga@gmail.com
(Pictured is actors Actor Howard Burnham portraying General Burgoyne and Paul Stillman portraying Benjamin Franklin.)

We commemorate the very spot where American Independence was made a great fact in the history of the world.
This photo was from the 225th Anniversary of the Battles of Saratoga in 2002 which was the largest of the most recent commemorations. But there has been an annual commemoration for years. The commemorations take different forms but they all recognize that “until the surrender of the British army under Burgoyne, the Declaration of Independence was but a declaration. It was a patriotic purpose asserted in bold words by brave men, who pledged for its main tenance their lives, their fortunes and their sacred honor. But here it was made a fact, by virtue of armed force. It had been regarded by the world merely as an act of defiance, but it was now seen that it contained the germs of a government, which the event we celebrate made one of the powers of the earth. Here rebellion was made revolution. Upon this ground, that which had in the eye of the law been treason, became triumphant patriotism,” according the Governor Horatio Seymour in 1877.
There is no doubt, this Victory at Saratoga is worthy of commemoration. We also have commemorate the over 500 casualties in the battles, skirmishes and siege that make up the Battles of Saratoga. The importance of this victory was explained in the New York Times Magazine (9 May 1999) in that “it launched two centuries of revolution elsewhere, it marked the beginning of the end of the British Empire and it breathed life into the United States of America.
The best way to explain why we commemorate the American Victory at Saratoga, was done by Governor Seymour. “these celebrations have tended to make our people wiser and better. It is to be hoped that they will be held on every battlefield in our country. They will not only restore the patriotism of our people but they will teach us the virtues of courage and patient endurance.”
We welcome those that wish to participate and contribute to the commemorations. Join in the pride, and you’ll appreciate the sense of community that’s been at the foundation of Saratoga for centuries. There are many ways you can help. To learn more contact historiantosaratoga@gmail.com
(Pictured is actors Actor Howard Burnham portraying General Burgoyne and Paul Stillman portraying Benjamin Franklin.)

We commemorate the very spot where American Independence was made a great fact in the history of the world.
This photo was from the 225th Anniversary of the Battles of Saratoga in 2002 which was the largest of the most recent commemorations. But there has been an annual commemoration for years. The commemorations take different forms but they all recognize that “until the surrender of the British army under Burgoyne, the Declaration of Independence was but a declaration. It was a patriotic purpose asserted in bold words by brave men, who pledged for its main tenance their lives, their fortunes and their sacred honor. But here it was made a fact, by virtue of armed force. It had been regarded by the world merely as an act of defiance, but it was now seen that it contained the germs of a government, which the event we celebrate made one of the powers of the earth. Here rebellion was made revolution. Upon this ground, that which had in the eye of the law been treason, became triumphant patriotism,” according the Governor Horatio Seymour in 1877.
There is no doubt, this Victory at Saratoga is worthy of commemoration. We also have commemorate the over 500 casualties in the battles, skirmishes and siege that make up the Battles of Saratoga. The importance of this victory was explained in the New York Times Magazine (9 May 1999) in that “it launched two centuries of revolution elsewhere, it marked the beginning of the end of the British Empire and it breathed life into the United States of America.
The best way to explain why we commemorate the American Victory at Saratoga, was done by Governor Seymour. “these celebrations have tended to make our people wiser and better. It is to be hoped that they will be held on every battlefield in our country. They will not only restore the patriotism of our people but they will teach us the virtues of courage and patient endurance.”
We welcome those that wish to participate and contribute to the commemorations. Join in the pride, and you’ll appreciate the sense of community that’s been at the foundation of Saratoga for centuries. There are many ways you can help. To learn more contact historiantosaratoga@gmail.com
(Pictured is actors Actor Howard Burnham portraying General Burgoyne and Paul Stillman portraying Benjamin Franklin.)

We commemorate the very spot where American Independence was made a great fact in the history of the world.
This photo was from the 225th Anniversary of the Battles of Saratoga in 2002 which was the largest of the most recent commemorations. But there has been an annual commemoration for years. The commemorations take different forms but they all recognize that “until the surrender of the British army under Burgoyne, the Declaration of Independence was but a declaration. It was a patriotic purpose asserted in bold words by brave men, who pledged for its main tenance their lives, their fortunes and their sacred honor. But here it was made a fact, by virtue of armed force. It had been regarded by the world merely as an act of defiance, but it was now seen that it contained the germs of a government, which the event we celebrate made one of the powers of the earth. Here rebellion was made revolution. Upon this ground, that which had in the eye of the law been treason, became triumphant patriotism,” according the Governor Horatio Seymour in 1877.
There is no doubt, this Victory at Saratoga is worthy of commemoration. We also have commemorate the over 500 casualties in the battles, skirmishes and siege that make up the Battles of Saratoga. The importance of this victory was explained in the New York Times Magazine (9 May 1999) in that “it launched two centuries of revolution elsewhere, it marked the beginning of the end of the British Empire and it breathed life into the United States of America.
The best way to explain why we commemorate the American Victory at Saratoga, was done by Governor Seymour. “these celebrations have tended to make our people wiser and better. It is to be hoped that they will be held on every battlefield in our country. They will not only restore the patriotism of our people but they will teach us the virtues of courage and patient endurance.”
We welcome those that wish to participate and contribute to the commemorations. Join in the pride, and you’ll appreciate the sense of community that’s been at the foundation of Saratoga for centuries. There are many ways you can help. To learn more contact historiantosaratoga@gmail.com
(Pictured is actors Actor Howard Burnham portraying General Burgoyne and Paul Stillman portraying Benjamin Franklin.)

We commemorate the very spot where American Independence was made a great fact in the history of the world.
This photo was from the 225th Anniversary of the Battles of Saratoga in 2002 which was the largest of the most recent commemorations. But there has been an annual commemoration for years. The commemorations take different forms but they all recognize that “until the surrender of the British army under Burgoyne, the Declaration of Independence was but a declaration. It was a patriotic purpose asserted in bold words by brave men, who pledged for its main tenance their lives, their fortunes and their sacred honor. But here it was made a fact, by virtue of armed force. It had been regarded by the world merely as an act of defiance, but it was now seen that it contained the germs of a government, which the event we celebrate made one of the powers of the earth. Here rebellion was made revolution. Upon this ground, that which had in the eye of the law been treason, became triumphant patriotism,” according the Governor Horatio Seymour in 1877.
There is no doubt, this Victory at Saratoga is worthy of commemoration. We also have commemorate the over 500 casualties in the battles, skirmishes and siege that make up the Battles of Saratoga. The importance of this victory was explained in the New York Times Magazine (9 May 1999) in that “it launched two centuries of revolution elsewhere, it marked the beginning of the end of the British Empire and it breathed life into the United States of America.
The best way to explain why we commemorate the American Victory at Saratoga, was done by Governor Seymour. “these celebrations have tended to make our people wiser and better. It is to be hoped that they will be held on every battlefield in our country. They will not only restore the patriotism of our people but they will teach us the virtues of courage and patient endurance.”
We welcome those that wish to participate and contribute to the commemorations. Join in the pride, and you’ll appreciate the sense of community that’s been at the foundation of Saratoga for centuries. There are many ways you can help. To learn more contact historiantosaratoga@gmail.com
(Pictured is actors Actor Howard Burnham portraying General Burgoyne and Paul Stillman portraying Benjamin Franklin.)

We commemorate the very spot where American Independence was made a great fact in the history of the world.
This photo was from the 225th Anniversary of the Battles of Saratoga in 2002 which was the largest of the most recent commemorations. But there has been an annual commemoration for years. The commemorations take different forms but they all recognize that “until the surrender of the British army under Burgoyne, the Declaration of Independence was but a declaration. It was a patriotic purpose asserted in bold words by brave men, who pledged for its main tenance their lives, their fortunes and their sacred honor. But here it was made a fact, by virtue of armed force. It had been regarded by the world merely as an act of defiance, but it was now seen that it contained the germs of a government, which the event we celebrate made one of the powers of the earth. Here rebellion was made revolution. Upon this ground, that which had in the eye of the law been treason, became triumphant patriotism,” according the Governor Horatio Seymour in 1877.
There is no doubt, this Victory at Saratoga is worthy of commemoration. We also have commemorate the over 500 casualties in the battles, skirmishes and siege that make up the Battles of Saratoga. The importance of this victory was explained in the New York Times Magazine (9 May 1999) in that “it launched two centuries of revolution elsewhere, it marked the beginning of the end of the British Empire and it breathed life into the United States of America.
The best way to explain why we commemorate the American Victory at Saratoga, was done by Governor Seymour. “these celebrations have tended to make our people wiser and better. It is to be hoped that they will be held on every battlefield in our country. They will not only restore the patriotism of our people but they will teach us the virtues of courage and patient endurance.”
We welcome those that wish to participate and contribute to the commemorations. Join in the pride, and you’ll appreciate the sense of community that’s been at the foundation of Saratoga for centuries. There are many ways you can help. To learn more contact historiantosaratoga@gmail.com
(Pictured is actors Actor Howard Burnham portraying General Burgoyne and Paul Stillman portraying Benjamin Franklin.)

We commemorate the very spot where American Independence was made a great fact in the history of the world.
This photo was from the 225th Anniversary of the Battles of Saratoga in 2002 which was the largest of the most recent commemorations. But there has been an annual commemoration for years. The commemorations take different forms but they all recognize that “until the surrender of the British army under Burgoyne, the Declaration of Independence was but a declaration. It was a patriotic purpose asserted in bold words by brave men, who pledged for its main tenance their lives, their fortunes and their sacred honor. But here it was made a fact, by virtue of armed force. It had been regarded by the world merely as an act of defiance, but it was now seen that it contained the germs of a government, which the event we celebrate made one of the powers of the earth. Here rebellion was made revolution. Upon this ground, that which had in the eye of the law been treason, became triumphant patriotism,” according the Governor Horatio Seymour in 1877.
There is no doubt, this Victory at Saratoga is worthy of commemoration. We also have commemorate the over 500 casualties in the battles, skirmishes and siege that make up the Battles of Saratoga. The importance of this victory was explained in the New York Times Magazine (9 May 1999) in that “it launched two centuries of revolution elsewhere, it marked the beginning of the end of the British Empire and it breathed life into the United States of America.
The best way to explain why we commemorate the American Victory at Saratoga, was done by Governor Seymour. “these celebrations have tended to make our people wiser and better. It is to be hoped that they will be held on every battlefield in our country. They will not only restore the patriotism of our people but they will teach us the virtues of courage and patient endurance.”
We welcome those that wish to participate and contribute to the commemorations. Join in the pride, and you’ll appreciate the sense of community that’s been at the foundation of Saratoga for centuries. There are many ways you can help. To learn more contact historiantosaratoga@gmail.com
(Pictured is actors Actor Howard Burnham portraying General Burgoyne and Paul Stillman portraying Benjamin Franklin.)

 

july 21

We commemorate the very spot where American Independence was made a great fact in the history of the world.
This photo was from the 225th Anniversary of the Battles of Saratoga in 2002 which was the largest of the most recent commemorations. But there has been an annual commemoration for years. The commemorations take different forms but they all recognize that “until the surrender of the British army under Burgoyne, the Declaration of Independence was but a declaration. It was a patriotic purpose asserted in bold words by brave men, who pledged for its main tenance their lives, their fortunes and their sacred honor. But here it was made a fact, by virtue of armed force. It had been regarded by the world merely as an act of defiance, but it was now seen that it contained the germs of a government, which the event we celebrate made one of the powers of the earth. Here rebellion was made revolution. Upon this ground, that which had in the eye of the law been treason, became triumphant patriotism,” according the Governor Horatio Seymour in 1877.
There is no doubt, this Victory at Saratoga is worthy of commemoration. We also have commemorate the over 500 casualties in the battles, skirmishes and siege that make up the Battles of Saratoga. The importance of this victory was explained in the New York Times Magazine (9 May 1999) in that “it launched two centuries of revolution elsewhere, it marked the beginning of the end of the British Empire and it breathed life into the United States of America.
The best way to explain why we commemorate the American Victory at Saratoga, was done by Governor Seymour. “these celebrations have tended to make our people wiser and better. It is to be hoped that they will be held on every battlefield in our country. They will not only restore the patriotism of our people but they will teach us the virtues of courage and patient endurance.”
We welcome those that wish to participate and contribute to the commemorations. Join in the pride, and you’ll appreciate the sense of community that’s been at the foundation of Saratoga for centuries. There are many ways you can help. To learn more contact historiantosaratoga@gmail.com
(Pictured is actors portaying the Americans in the tabloid.)

We commemorate the very spot where American Independence was made a great fact in the history of the world.
This photo was from the 225th Anniversary of the Battles of Saratoga in 2002 which was the largest of the most recent commemorations. But there has been an annual commemoration for years. The commemorations take different forms but they all recognize that “until the surrender of the British army under Burgoyne, the Declaration of Independence was but a declaration. It was a patriotic purpose asserted in bold words by brave men, who pledged for its main tenance their lives, their fortunes and their sacred honor. But here it was made a fact, by virtue of armed force. It had been regarded by the world merely as an act of defiance, but it was now seen that it contained the germs of a government, which the event we celebrate made one of the powers of the earth. Here rebellion was made revolution. Upon this ground, that which had in the eye of the law been treason, became triumphant patriotism,” according the Governor Horatio Seymour in 1877.
There is no doubt, this Victory at Saratoga is worthy of commemoration. We also have commemorate the over 500 casualties in the battles, skirmishes and siege that make up the Battles of Saratoga. The importance of this victory was explained in the New York Times Magazine (9 May 1999) in that “it launched two centuries of revolution elsewhere, it marked the beginning of the end of the British Empire and it breathed life into the United States of America.
The best way to explain why we commemorate the American Victory at Saratoga, was done by Governor Seymour. “these celebrations have tended to make our people wiser and better. It is to be hoped that they will be held on every battlefield in our country. They will not only restore the patriotism of our people but they will teach us the virtues of courage and patient endurance.”
We welcome those that wish to participate and contribute to the commemorations. Join in the pride, and you’ll appreciate the sense of community that’s been at the foundation of Saratoga for centuries. There are many ways you can help. To learn more contact historiantosaratoga@gmail.com
(Pictured is actors Actor Howard Burnham portraying General Burgoyne and Paul Stillman portraying Benjamin Franklin.)

July 10 8 pm
We commemorate the very spot where American Independence was made a great fact in the history of the world.
This photo was from the 225th Anniversary of the Battles of Saratoga in 2002 which was the largest of the most recent commemorations. But there has been an annual commemoration for years. The commemorations take different forms but they all recognize that “until the surrender of the British army under Burgoyne, the Declaration of Independence was but a declaration. It was a patriotic purpose asserted in bold words by brave men, who pledged for its main tenance their lives, their fortunes and their sacred honor. But here it was made a fact, by virtue of armed force. It had been regarded by the world merely as an act of defiance, but it was now seen that it contained the germs of a government, which the event we celebrate made one of the powers of the earth. Here rebellion was made revolution. Upon this ground, that which had in the eye of the law been treason, became triumphant patriotism,” according the Governor Horatio Seymour in 1877.
There is no doubt, this Victory at Saratoga is worthy of commemoration. We also have commemorate the over 500 casualties in the battles, skirmishes and siege that make up the Battles of Saratoga. The importance of this victory was explained in the New York Times Magazine (9 May 1999) in that “it launched two centuries of revolution elsewhere, it marked the beginning of the end of the British Empire and it breathed life into the United States of America.
The best way to explain why we commemorate the American Victory at Saratoga, was done by Governor Seymour. “these celebrations have tended to make our people wiser and better. It is to be hoped that they will be held on every battlefield in our country. They will not only restore the patriotism of our people but they will teach us the virtues of courage and patient endurance.”
We welcome those that wish to participate and contribute to the commemorations. Join in the pride, and you’ll appreciate the sense of community that’s been at the foundation of Saratoga for centuries. There are many ways you can help. To learn more contact historiantosaratoga@gmail.com
(Pictured in this photo from left to right: Actor Howard Burnham, Re-enactor Paul Loding portraying General Burgoyne, (Loding 17 Aug.1949 – 10 Nov 2016 was the recreated Lieutenant Colonel of the 53rd Regiment of foot in North America for 35 years, Hudson Falls and Kingsbury town historian, Commissioner on NYS 250th Anniversary of the French and Indian War Commemorative Commission, and Saratoga National Historical Park volunteer.) Re-enactor Chris Petronis dressed as a British engineer.)
We commemorate Saratoga!, 2002, 225th
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